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James Robert Lay: 

Digital growth is a journey. It is a journey from good to great, but it is not a journey that one takes alone as an individual. No. Digital growth is a journey that individuals and teams throughout your bank throughout your credit with retro FinTech commit to take together. But how can you commit to take this journey if you're so busy, that you don't have space and time to break free from what you're doing right now in the present moment, to review where you've been to gain new insights into potential future growth opportunities through education, and then to really think about how to apply what you've been learning to continue to move forward to do even better together? Well, let's find out together on today's episode of the banking on digital growth Podcast.

 

Greetings and Hello, I'm James Robert Lay, and I'd like to welcome you to another episode of the Banking on Digital Growth Podcast. Today's episode is part of the digital growth journey series. And joining me for today's conversation is Matt Vance. Matt is the first vice president of marketing and product strategy at slough credit union, a financial cooperative that believes people are powerful when they work together. Now, Matt and his team have lived out this belief as they have all been working together to move forward and make progress along their digital growth journey at slough. And you can do the same by applying the insights that Matt shares so that you can maximize your future growth potential at your bank at your credit union Archer fintech. Welcome to the show, Matt, it is good to share time with you today, buddy.

 

Matt Vance: 

Yeah, great to see you too.

 

James Robert Lay: 

I'm loving the sunny skies in Seattle right now such a beautiful day. It looks good. On camera. For those who are listening, you should actually check out the video because Matt, he's very well lit. I thought it was sunny skies. No, it's just just gray. But we always have to look to the bright side. So before we get into talking about your progress that you've made, that your team has made along your digital growth journey, what is what has been going well, for you, personally, professionally to pick to get started?

 

Matt Vance: 

We've got a lot of really, really great things going on here at slough recently, we've been working for the last year on a brand new website, we're set to launch here at the start of December, on that, we've got some new awareness campaigns pumping out for us. So really just kind of targeting to some some niche areas that we've been interested in growing and building out. So we've got some of that out there getting some of the first rounds of data back on that seeing some progress there. So a lot of good things is ran in the year here and getting ready for a good 2024.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Well, your team, you've been on this journey. And I think it's very interesting to note for those watching and listening, that it's comprised that it has been comprised of a cross section of leaders across the credit union, y'all have recently wrapped up the digital growth University. And think about all the progress you've made, I want to come back to this point here that you made on these two points around niche and website. But think about all the progress that you made on your journey. When you first started this to where you're at now, for you, what have been the biggest lessons that you have learned as a leader to this point through this journey?

 

Matt Vance: 

Yeah, that's a that's a really good question. It's been, it's been a great experience so far, and being able to kind of finish up that digital growth University in the last few months here. And you're right, we tried to take an approach, when we first looked at bringing the program on board, we knew we wanted it to be a good cross section of our organization. And I think that's one of the biggest things that we've learned through this is, is finding to make sure that I get that vision and that alignment at the top of the organization, and then activate that through the management and the VPS within the organization that really have the pulse on the day to day and can really kind of start to drive some results and get them excited and bought into the vision. I mean, I think that's where we really started to see some good success with that. I've had some good conversations with our managers that have been involved in the program. And they start to say, we've been wanting to do this stuff for years, or, Oh, I see how it can apply this over to that program over there. And so we really kind of started to engage and start to activate and excite folks around here, which is great, because I think it's been a bit of that cultural shift that we needed, that we needed. This couldn't just be a top down, we're going to tell you everything we're going to do. We really wanted to make this kind of a cross section of the organization and gain that buy in and activation throughout.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Well, it's interesting to note that this has been an exercise and open strategy. And when you look at open strategy, it's a newer school of thought. I'm curious to get your take because as you reflect on this experience, not everyone is open to this. You have been your team has been your organization has been but what would you recommend to others who might not have the same level of commitment that you all did? To first and foremost, ongoing learning as a path to future growth? That's because just learning provides that perspective. It helps people see things different help helps. People think about things different. But not everyone is there yet. And the world is changing at such a rapid pace that I feel like, it's not just a technology gap anymore, that is holding Community Financial brands back like credit and community banks. It's also a knowledge and an awareness gap, what would your take be on this?

 

Matt Vance: 

I think there's power in a shared experience to that, right. And in a learning experience like that, a lot of what we did in the digital Growth Institute, and in the university side of thing tends to lean a little bit more into the marketing side of things, right. And that's, that's my wheelhouse, that's my team's wheelhouse. They don't want to hear it just from me, they don't want to be taught or talked down to from the marketing people telling them they need to do these things, or this is how we're the path we're gonna go. I think there's a sense of shared experience, I think there's a sense of collaboration in there. As marketers, I think we pride ourselves in collaboration, we know that, you know, better things happen when people work together, better ideas can come to the to the forefront when we work together. So I think that shared experience side of it was really, really important. Let's all go through this educational experience together, let's all be on the same page as we work through it. And having that shared experience, and that shared learning environment has been so crucial. I mean, I get in conversations weekly here that it's like, oh, yeah, back in that lesson, remember when he talked about that, right. And that's outside of the marketing team. So it's telling me that it's sticking, it makes my team have to do a whole lot less of the heavy lifting, because we had this shared experience together, right. And, you know, bringing in that outsider to help kind of Usher that through is really helpful, I think, to obtain that buy in to. So for us, it's been it's been really, really important. So, you know, having that that collaboration, that open experience, I think has been so key to where we've seen such more of an accelerated growth than you know, we'd maybe been in the last year and this topic.

 

James Robert Lay: 

It’s interesting, because you talk about this acceleration, I understand that people feel like they get it's a matter of perception, they feel like they get stuck. And they feel like well, I've been I've been trying to communicate this internally, your perspective on a shared experience, what others have used or coined a common language, has helped to remove some of the roadblocks that has led to human transformation in conjunction with digital transformation. You touched on this idea of niche before and that niche is something I've discussed on the podcast. But when you think about your organization, and you look at the growth opportunities for niche, why look at a niche compared to say, just the general mass market of the community, what is helped to facilitate that transformation? Because you were even thinking that before we were even having conversations, but I would say that what what I was sharing through this with your team at a broader macro level, maybe either reinforce that or provided some additional thinking to help spur that or to use your words to help accelerate that much further, farther, faster. But why a niche in today's complex digital world?

 

Matt Vance: 

Yeah, no, I mean, you know, you can scale digital so easily. And that's the beauty of it. Right. But I think for us, we've always found more success when we have targeted, more specifically found an audience that has a need. You know, we kind of pride ourselves in a little bit of a scene here, you know, we want to do the hard things others don't. Right. There's a lot of markets that other people don't want to touch, or don't think they're going to be profitable. We think we think there's chances there, right, we deserve or we believe that opportunity deserves a chance. Right? That's, that's another kind of a credo that we live by here at slough. So those niches are really important to us, it kind of goes back to it super high level, kind of kind of back to that blue ocean red ocean strategy, right? Why go compete in a red ocean environment, when everyone around you is doing the same thing trying to capture the same market? Find where there isn't that that hyper competition, right? And try to build out something for yourself there. It's also quite honestly, it's just a lot more interesting that way too. You know, I get to come into work every day instead of going, you know, how are we going to compete against you know, Seattle is a pretty hyper competitive banking market. Here. We have some amazing credit unions locally. Here, we have a lot of community banks in this area, obviously, all the tech industries and everyone around here, so every wants to be here. So it gets really really competitive from a banking environment up here so why go compete head to head day in and day out against all of those folks, when we can just find our own little niches, we've been able to be really successful and growing our organization and just kind of finding those and growing those and building communities within those niches and, and I think to me, it's, you know, it's proven profitable. And again, it's really interesting work because you get to kind of build something to be at the forefront of something.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Well, that's where the the work that you've done as as individuals as a team, you have the marketing team, but then you have the larger cohort with across sexuals with different business leaders from different business. lines, I would say if I recall, there was a big aha moment around class number nine and 10, which was around the story selling methodology. And then that led into a conversation in class 10, around content, which connects back to this idea of niche. Because I vividly remember, there was a lot of excitement, not necessarily coming from marketing, but coming from other business lines. And I guess it's just where it really begin to click have, we have the potential to play the role of this helpful, this empathetic guide, we've probably had been playing the hero in the past, and it's no one's no one's fault to that. It's just that's just what, what the perspective was. But when you think about niche in content, and focus, where's the opportunity here to continue to leverage like you said, digital is a is a multiplier, it allows us to scale very, very quickly content is, is a path for to make connections and place deposits into the minds of people within these niche communities and community goes beyond the the physical borders of boundaries and zip codes. But when you think about the awareness in the common bond, the common language, first and foremost, internally, and then externally, how is content playing into this perspective, from your worldview? Within marketing?

 

Matt Vance: 

Yeah, I think a few different ways. And I think we've learned through this process, in bringing those kind of cross section of right bringing our business lines through this process to is help them realize that they have a lot of good stories to tell, that we can throw it offers, right? You can all day everyday, throw out a great CD rate, you can throw in a great auto rate, and you can go and you can fish, and you can get what you need there and move on to the next thing. But that's not a long term strategy. That's not a viable, you know, community building niche building strategy. It's the people that we're helping, it's the stories that they have, that we were there when no one else was for them, right. And so as those as those teams started to kind of go through this story selling methodology, they started to understand we I work with members every day that tell me these things. How do I get that over to you guys? How does how does marketing activate those for us now. And so that's been really important back and forth now. And we've been able to take that or, you know, one example, good example over here is, is our business services team, and be able to work with their business members who had a great story to tell, you know, specifically, we do a lot of work in the cannabis industry, we were one of the first here in Washington to get started. And we've been able to grow that and been able to really help that industry grow along with it, too. And those some of those businesses had some really hard times gaining access to traditional banking environment. There's a lot of really tough stories out there. And so for us, it was like, Guys, this is really great content that we can take. And let's tell those businesses stories, in through those stories, were able to tell how we were able to help. And that just produces content off of that we've been able to go out we we shot a few a few of those stories with our businesses and created whole campaigns off of that have created both, you know, from video content, to blog content to advertising content, all based upon the stories in which we can tell and can frame it around them. So there's those stories have a lot, they have a lot of legs, so you can take it into a lot of different directions. And that content isn't just we're going to interview someone we're going to put on a blog, there's so many different areas that we can go off with that we are kicking around him as we sit here and talk on a podcast, we've been kicking around the idea of wanting to get a podcast off the ground for us too. And that's something we're starting to look into as well, because we do we work with a lot of businesses, we work with a lot of members that have interesting stories to tell. And why not? Why not share that and share with that together with them?

 

James Robert Lay: 

Why? Why is human transformation so hard? When it comes to because I'm asking and you're laughing? If you're not watching Matt's giving a bit of a of a chuckle right now, I'm laughing too, because this is to me has been the hardest part of any organization, and which is why I respect the work that you've been doing. Because if I think back historically, over the last decade, I've led marketing leaders VPS SVPs, through a bootcamp like experience, and then they had to go back and then communicate this with their team and it was met with mixed reaction. And then I said, Okay, well, let's take the marketing teams through this. And that's great marketing begins to learn, marketing begins to transform, but then there's others in the organization who feel like they're getting left behind. You know, if I think about having to work with technology, or work with people, technology sometimes seems to be quote unquote, easier. Because you tell the technology to do what the technology is going to do and the technology tends to for the most part, it works. But then there's this whole complexity around human transformation. Why? Why is the people side of this so hard from from your perspective and experience? Yeah,

 

Matt Vance: 

No, it's it's a good question. You know, I think we're creatures of habit, we're creatures of safety. Right? So change equals risk. And so, so for anyone to do something differently, open themselves up to new ideas, it's a risk, it could fail, does that mean that they fail? Are they a failure? Right? So, you know, it's, it's a different dynamic there, I think, you know, being able to put yourself out there take that risk, try something new, is, is challenging. And obviously, there's others that are that are better at it than than some and they're able to take those risks and, and really become the multipliers of the leaders in their industry, right. But I think it's it's trying to, again, educate yourself, understand what the changes happen, why the change is happening, and make a calculated risk, you don't have to lean in all all 100%, right at the right at the start, right? Maybe maybe 25% at a time, right, do do a few tests, here and there and see what happens test and learn test and learn, right? I think is a good way to combat that. But I think in general, most folks cash, they just, they just don't want the risk, they don't want the change. They're used to doing it the way they've done it, right. And that's a hard thing for some folks to move off

 

James Robert Lay: 

of. And that's one of the reasons like when we developed this digital growth University methodology, it was to create a space with some psychological safety that, you know, you're you're here to learn, I am here to learn just as much as you're here to learn. I definitely have a perspective. But other people have a perspective, too, I take the Socratic approach to knowledge that I know I know nothing. And I reserve the right to change my perspective based upon new information. And I think that is where the sharing of ideas, particularly as y'all came together once a month, as a community cohort, you're learning as individuals, doing some self reflective thinking. And then you came together as a team, you had small breakouts to where you're able to share some thinking and a private one on one context or a group small group of three, and then we will take that back. And it builds this habit of you know, what it's okay to share, it's okay to learn, it's okay to say I don't even know. And we're going to continue to learn together. And that's where you not only through the university, you've also learned, particularly more so as a marketing team, but then also, I think business lines have have learned through this as well, which is the digital secret shopping studies that y'all started with. And you benchmark your website against others, which, as you mentioned, to start this conversation, you're in the process of getting ready to launch a new website, how did those insights jeweler very early on, in this experience, provide a path for to guide you to build this new website that sells?

 

Matt Vance: 

Yeah, no, I think that's a, you know, the main thing there that we learned was, you know, you can have CTAs littered throughout your site. But it doesn't mean anyone's going to click, it doesn't mean they're ready to buy at that moment. So you know, I think for us is getting better at nurturing that lead. And that sales process through not a, well, we gave you all the information on page, so you should be ready to just click and apply now, doesn't mean they're ready, and it doesn't mean they're going to come back. So how do we start to set that relationship up for success? How do we start to build some trust and rapport? You know, how do we get to you to say, hey, we know you're in the market for an auto, download this guy that's going to help you, you know, find the best car for you or find the best financing for you, right? We're able to capture that lead, we're able to then start them on a drip campaign that helps them better realize, and we can kind of stay in touch with them, keeps Top of Mind with them. So when they are ready, they're gonna come back to us. You know, I think we were trying to kind of force the sale a little bit too much there. So as we were looking really at this new website, we really wanted to take an approach and look at of how do we nurture these leads a little bit better? How do we build that trust and rapport and and not just sell? Right? We want to build relationships with that new site. So in the end goal is obviously always how do we get you to sell? Or how do we get you to, to consider us down the road, right? But But really, we understand that through building trust and rapport with them, than just giving you the information and thinking that that's going to be the thing that's gonna make you say, Yep, let's do it.

 

James Robert Lay: 

It comes back to what I was referencing before with class time in the university is it's playing the role of the helpful and empathetic guide. And I really do find that it's then that class that connects back to some of the foundational strategies and classics around the digital, the digital journey buying journey that people take. That's where people like I I'm starting to get it. I'm trying to understand it and then you can apply that now going forward into these different experiences like building a website as you are. You bring up a really great point. And I think about I want to get your take on this. There was another organization who I was recently talking to, and they shared with me that they drove and they bought some traffic. So digital ad campaign, they drove 12,000 visits to their primary checking account page. So they 3x traffic. But conversions stayed flat. They had no change in conversion. And I think this was like an over a 90 day period of time. And my question was, well, did you change anything from day one to day 30? From say, going from there to day 31? Or day one to 14, change something day? 15? And they said, No. And I said, Well, did you run any secret shopping on this particular initiative? They said, No. And I said, So you kept everything said are superb, is all things being equal? Throughout the 90 day period? They said, Yes. Why, from your perspective? Do some organizations, they launch something, and then they think, man, we just spent all this money, we bought all this traffic, but we didn't see a bump in conversions. And they perceive it as a failure? And I'm like, No, that was a learning experience. Because you learned that 12,000 people, or 12,000 people who visited this particular product page, that's great. The lesson is, though, Why did no one take the next steps, and it was from from doing this over 1000 times now was very obvious, it was a positioning, it was a little bit of UX, it was a little bit of call to action, little micro changes that you could have made that I guarantee would have increased their conversion rate, and they would have saw a bump in that. But why do some, we'll just say marketing teams or marketing leaders, failed to gain ongoing learning from the marketplace. And as a result, they're losing millions and loans and deposits.

 

Matt Vance: 

Yeah, you know, try to try to call back into my my 18 years of experience in marketing within this industry. And sure, you know, it's, it's a handful of things, it's probably a little bit different for every organization, I've been guilty of it myself, over my years, as well, I think maybe two traps that I could fall into is, is one is you get so enamored with the creative and what you did, and you think it's so great that, you know, the dude didn't change anything with this, this was this work is some of the most stellar work we've ever put out, it just just needs to hit that edge of where people enough people get there, and eventually, they're gonna get it and, and kind of drive it. So I definitely think that's one of it. I think another trap that a lot of marketing teams get into, I see this a lot within credit unions to is, you know, the teams are just busy. And so they're able to, they're able to get that campaign out, they're able to launch that campaign, but then they're on to the next thing, and they don't have the time, they don't build the time to monitor and adjust. And I can say, Look, I've been guilty of that many, many times myself, I think that's something was we're launching this new website, we were mindful of, and I think, you know, the the digital growth university really helped us understand this too, is we need to be a lot more mindful about building that monitoring, and that testing, and that constant evolution of that website, not to be a static, a static thing that, oh, we'll take a look every six months or once a year, we're gonna go give the the website, you know, a Polish, it's an ongoing day to day, practice, right, and you're maybe taking different sections, and you're looking at that or, or maybe depending upon what campaigns and in areas of focus you're running. But it's a living breathing tool that has to have that that nurturing, it's like a plant, right, you're gonna have to water it to see it grow, you're gonna have to make sure it's getting enough sunlight to see it grow. And there's a lot of different components to check or kind of plug into that website to help that. But the idea that you could build it, and they'll come and they'll do what you want is is, you know, something that you know, is it's rare that it happens it does, you know, from time to time, but But it gets rare. And I think I've learned that throughout the years to have you've got to nurture it better.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Well, you bring up a great point, you mentioned 18 years of prospecting perspective, I want to go back all the way 18 years ago on your mind to where you're at today, because I'm right there with you. I'm pushing 2122 years now. And if you think back over the last 18 years of just your own journey of growth, how do you feel marketing has transformed the most over the past 18 years?

 

Matt Vance: 

I can say for me personally, I can think back, you know, running a small marketing department, you know, in my early 20s at $125 million credit union making copies of rate brochures on pastel papers. I mean, there's been a lot of change from that right. And helping that that that organization kind of grow and mature and its marketing branding and and you're going to experience there. So, yeah, I mean, gosh, I think digital is probably overall that that biggest change that idea of of what we can do and how you can communicate with people, the numbers of things and areas and places you can communicate with folks with now is just, it's just massive, right. And so, you know, trying to wrap your head around that, and that's constantly changing. So, you know, get good people around you that have different perspectives that are not consuming the same media in the same places that you are, to really understand those perspectives better understand where you're missing gaps and opportunities. There's a lot of really good partners, a lot of your teammates are able to go out there and help with that as well. Right? No one, you know, marketing executive today has all the answers. There's just too much out there. It's too fast. There's just changing so often,

 

James Robert Lay: 

I'm so glad you pointed on that. I want to highlight it, you said no one marketing executive has all the answers. And for the CEOs and others in the C suite who are listening, please, please hear that because it is happening. The transformation is happening at such a massive point. I've even started doing some exercises with other organizations just asking what's a philosophic question? What is marketing and ask it across the organization because it's a matter of perspective. And I think to your point, when you start gaining perspectives from from different people through different paths are different experiences, it's very helpful to gain awareness and alignment of where people are just meaning where they're at. It's not right, it's not wrong. And then you can create a path forward together. And you use the word collaboration earlier, on this note, starting to look ahead towards the future as we start to wrap up here. Where does AI play into this next evolution? Because this is like, I think back, you know, 1994 was the year the internet reach the mass consciousness of humanity. And now we're pretty much 30 years after that. We're one year into the AI experience at a macro consciousness level of humanity, going back to November 30 2022, with Chad GPT. Which, as of recording, that's a whole interesting narrative. I took off, I was doing an entrepreneur workshop at my kids school on Friday, and then took off Saturday, Sunday, Monday, just disconnected from the world. And I come back on Tuesday As of recording and saw the whole open AI, Sam Altman news, and that whole shake up, it's like, wow, that's the whole thing that I started have to reroute my head around. But when you think about AI, through the lens of of marketing, and just the lens of growth, where's Where's where's your head with this yourself?

 

Matt Vance: 

I mean, there's a lot of opportunities, opportunities there, we have already been able to leverage, you know, you know, some scale off of that, you know, personally, you know, our team is really leaned into from a content and copywriting perspective, being able to help us move faster in a lot of those areas. I mean, that's just kind of scratching the surface type stuff to it. I think this is where it's important, again, get people around you that are smarter and passionate about these things. Right. Not to say that I'm not I think it's really interesting. I do think it's going to transform a lot of what we do, but there's other people who are more invested and watch this a whole lot more closely than I do. Right. And so get those people around you that can help show you the opportunities as well. You know, I do think there's a lot we're starting to look at to see how it can potentially transform our our experience from a member standpoint, right? How does it help our call centers? How does it help some of our other teams, how's it going to help us analyze data and help us make smarter decisions? I think that's where I'd like to kind of watch and, and build and grow capabilities there too. It has the ability to analyze huge sets of data really fast and build recommendations off of that. So how do we use that and leverage that to make us smarter, I think will kind of be key key going forward.

 

James Robert Lay: 

It's continuous continuously learning and looking into opportunities, which is ongoing education and awareness. And that's it, you have to be an expert in everything. It's just like you said, surround yourself with people who are passionate about it, I think that's important, but also are able to transform that passion into practical application, which, as we wrap up here, when you look ahead towards the future, number one, what are you just most feeling most hopeful, most excited about for your future in the future of the credit union, through the work that you've been doing are doing and will continue to go forward into the future doing?

 

Matt Vance: 

Yeah, you know, I am I am you know, we're in a season of Thanksgiving here. Um, you know, I am greatly thankful for my team, you know, I've been able to surround myself with, with amazing people in my marketing staff where we're talented, who are smarter than I am in a lot of these things, and want to grow and build and push these things. And the executive team here we've been able to make, you know, some good decisions and put people in the right places, I think to x tolerate some of that growth and some of that opportunity, right? leaning into those niches is an area where we want to where we want to be. And in finding those those open spaces for us, it's interesting work. It's exciting work. I think, as I mentioned earlier, so for that, I'm really excited to see how we can grow and evolve as an organization, I think there's a lot of space to ramp up, especially once kind of the market kind of starts to take a little bit better return here. I think that acceleration of growth for a lot of organizations out there, it's going to be a fun time again, right now it's not, it's not an entirely fun time to be in banking for a lot. So I think we're kind of on the cusp of hopefully kind of getting out of that. So really excited to see where we can go kind of next from there.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Well, the good news is, everything is a cycle. The sun always follows the darkness. The light is at the break of dawn, if you will. And with that, what would be always like to wrap up on a practical note, the one thing that you would recommend someone who is watching someone who is listening, that they do next on their own journey of growth to practically apply some of what we've been talking about here so that they can walk away with their next best step going forward into the future. What would the one thing that you would recommend next on their journey?

 

Matt Vance: 

Yeah, I would say just just open themselves up to opportunities, open themselves up to collaboration, you know, thinking you can learn it all yourself thinking that you can build it all yourself, it's, it's so much easier when able to find a good team of people around you. Whether that be peers inside of your organization, or peers outside in the industry to, you know, just being able to have that support network around and challenge and push each other, I think accelerates growth so much faster and opens yourself up to new ideas you didn't even consider.

 

James Robert Lay: 

One plus one equals 11. That's the Collaboration Multiplier right there. And it's a great way to wrap up our conversation, Matt, it has been a good one. Thank you for joining me if someone wants to continue the conversation that we've discussed today, or we started discussing today, to your point of collaboration, what's the best way that they can just connect, reach out say hello to you?

 

Matt Vance: 

You can you can find me. You can find me online on Twitter, or LinkedIn is a great place to connect with me as well.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Connect with Matt Vance. Learn with Matt Vance. Grow with Matt Vance. Matt, thank you for joining me for another episode of the banking on digital growth podcast. This has been a lot of fun today, buddy. Awesome, thanks. Good seeing you. Good seeing you as always, and until next time, be well, do good and be the light

 

Brief Summary of Episode #353

Digital growth is more than a buzzword—it's a commitment, a culture, and a collaborative quest from good to great.

And it's a journey we don't have to embark on alone.

In this episode of the Digital Growth Journeys series, we're joined by Matt Vance, FVP of Marketing & Product Strategy at Salal Credit Union, who sheds light on the power of unity in the digital trek.

Matt and his team at Salal are testament to what happens when a financial cooperative unites under a shared vision for progress, leveraging collective wisdom to navigate the digital landscape.

Their story is an inspiring blueprint for banks, credit unions, and FinTechs eager to unlock their growth potential.

Tap into the experiences of those leading the charge in digital transformation.

Discover how to carve out time for strategic reflection, education, and the application of new insights to drive your organization forward.

 

Key Insights and Takeaways

  • Niche marketing for growth in a complex digital world (4:49)
  • Leveraging storytelling in marketing (9:48)
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