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James Robert Lay: 

I want to take you back in your mind to early 2020. How would you feel if you knew that over the next two years, the world was going to shut down and because of COVID, you'd go through a merger, launch a new brand. And then on top of that, not just build a new website that sells, but also optimize it every 90 days or so to continue to create even more value for different business lines within your organization. Do you feel just a little bit stressed a little bit overwhelmed or would you feel excited? Would you feel energized? Today, you're gonna learn how one marketing leader was able to confidently navigate the complexities of all of these changes together with her team on this episode of the banking on digital growth Podcast.

 

Greetings and Hello, I'm James Robert Lay and I'd like to welcome you to another episode of the banking on digital growth podcast. Today's episode is part of the digital growth journey series. And joining me for today's conversation is Sara Williams. Sara is the marketing director at Skyla Credit Union. Over the past few years, Sara and her team have made tremendous progress together along their digital growth journey. Today, we're going to dive into some of the greatest lessons Sarah has learned along the way, along with the work how the work that she's done with her team continues to create even greater value for different business lines within their organization. Welcome to the show, Sarah, it is so good to share time with you today. Thank you, I'm excited to be here. Before we get into talking about your digital journey, the progress that you've made as an individual as a team, as an organization, what has been going well for you what is positive in your world personally or professionally, it is always your pick to get started.

 

Sara Williams: 

Yeah. So last week, I actually spent the week down in Charlotte, my whole team is remote. And so we got to spend a full three days together, some of us around California, some of I'm in Connecticut, somebody's in Texas. So it was just, I mean, I think we're also riding that high of just getting able to spend so much time together. And it was just, we get along really well on camera all day every day. But it was just really fun to have that extra team time together and to be friends. There wasn't a lot of work involved. But it was a lot of fun just to be together. Well,

 

James Robert Lay: 

I can't attest, he'll do a great job in the 2d world collaborating, working and CO creating value. And then you've been able to take that into the 3d world to just reinforce those relationships. And I think about just the progress that you all have made. I want to go back to what things were like when you first got started on this journey. About three years ago, because you're in a different place. The world was in a different place, the organization was in a different place, the team was in a different place. I mean, it was it was early 2020. And the world was just going through a period of massive change and transformation, obviously with the COVID pandemic. But take us back what was just your team, like what were you like when it came to just the idea of marketing back then your perspective, if you will, of what things were back then.

 

Sara Williams: 

Yeah, so pre pandemic. So if we come back to February of 2020, I was part of a team of three I was the marketing specialist at the time and my boss was about to go out on a maternity leave. So it was kind of which was already kind of terrifying. We didn't know what was to come a couple of weeks later but so that in itself was kind of scary. So we had before she left we had this whole plan of like okay, this is when we're going to send this email and this is when we're going to do this social posts and this is like we were trying to be so prepared and ahead of the game so that while she was gone, there wouldn't be a lot of hiccups or stumbles and I am pretty sure the week before she went out on leave the world shut down. So she was basically like okay, bye and it was myself and I was this senior of the two of us and another team member and we just had to kind of navigate like branches are our whole plan was just kind of shot we you know we had to navigate this branches closing and this is we're going to you know drive through only and oh, somebody has a positive here so we have to close this one and it was literally just a mad dash for the entire three months that she was out. So one time she came back it was like okay, well what you know what happened? It's like, we survived. We made it through we got you know the six The six feet apart, like Dorothy got her floor decals. And we were that was it. That was all I cared about. So there was a lot of pivoting and adjusting for sure.

 

James Robert Lay: 

But I think that was almost a warm up of the changes that you would experience as an individual, as a team as an organization. Within the following not just months, but even the years to come. It's almost like it was, everything happens for a reason, in hindsight, but in the middle of it, it's chaotic. It's confusing, it's terrifying. In some cases, when you think about where you came from there, y'all went into the digital growth university, you started learning this methodology that led to the building of a new website to the launch of a new brand, I mean, to the merger, it's just been so much in a relatively short period of time, and you've also elevated yourself to as a leader, so give us some context into that progress there have. And I think that's the point. It's progress. It's not perfection, you've if you look back, and you measure where you've come, if you were at that moment in time, and leaping ahead to where you're at now, in your in your in, you said this is where I'm going to be? How would your mind perceive that back then?

 

Sara Williams: 

I don't, I don't think that I would have been able to even imagine where I'm sitting today. And that's not to, you know, make me sound so wonderful. It means but you met us and you you, you know, we started with the digital Growth Institute at a very interesting time for the organization. I say this all the time, we are very fortunate that our organization really believes in marketing and understands the important find us so we've never really gotten pushed back to the point of, you know, like, we're allowed to make our decisions. And so if we're, if we say, hey, we want to do DGI, and this is why or hey, we want to switch our website, or hey, we want to do XY and Z, like we have the buy in to do so. And I I totally realized that there are not a lot of organizations that have that. My mom was actually the marketing director of a credit union in the 90s. And I'll like tell her, you know, we just went through a budget. And so I told her how much our budget was. And she's like, Sarah, I had to fight to get a fax machine for our department and three others to share it. So she's like, That is incredible.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Yeah, absolutely. It's interesting, you know, I, when you when you when you don't have that perspective, and use your mom, or do use others who might be watching or listening. I think it's, it's possible, but it takes time, it takes patience, it takes education, educating and helping others within the organization, to understand back to your point, the value of marketing. But education has been a key part of your transformation, as well as as, particularly as a team going through the the university in the knowledge that you're able to take and work in collaboration with another agency to apply that to build this, not just a website, but a website that sells that is continuously being improved, continuously being optimized. What value has that education, because I think a lot of times, you can have knowledge. But if you don't apply that knowledge, it doesn't create value, but I've seen the value not being created just once but continuously, particularly through the work that you've you've been doing. Let's unpack some of that there. Because you've got, we'll start with the website. Number one, and really a website that sells. Yeah.

 

Sara Williams: 

So I'm pretty sure that we started the first round of DGI, with you probably, I think, the summer of 2020. And the we knew, so we were merging in 21. And then we knew that we wanted to do a website in 21, after the merger happened. And so when we started the program, it it definitely energized us. But I think at this at, you know, at the end, how it's what kind of roadblocks Do you have? What opportunities do you have? And at the end of every one, it's like, well, once we can, you know, launch the website once we can get past the merger. And so for a very long time, the roadblocks were things that were outside of our control, but we were still super excited to get it done. And so we actually, you know, we went through the merger, I think we took a pause for merger. And then I think back during the website, and we kind of started over with the website when we started the program over and it was that second time that it was a lot of like clicking of oh, okay, that's why we're gonna do this or that makes sense as to why and so we partnered with an agency that their model is they asked you answer and so it was a lot less of, oh well the credit union needs auto loans. So we're just going to email everybody auto loans and it was more of, you know, let's put, let's meet them where they are, let's provide them the information that they need, right, they're not buying an auto loan, they're buying a car, and it's just a matter of how they're going to get that car. And that's where we come into the picture. So through that whole process, so we went through both with the agency and DGI, at the same time, which was super helpful, because they really just complemented each other is in what we were learning. And at the same time of the website, launch slash first merger, we we gained the content specialist who was able to come in, and all she does is write content and education. And she she educates our members and prospects and is just super, you know, she has the the mindset of a consumer. And it's again, it's not Oh, well, the credit union needs, needs credit cards that right now it's okay, well, how can we provide all of that information of how to best use a credit card? When Shouldn't you get a credit card? You know, how do I What is interest rate for a credit card and all those pieces that in the end is going to help your members even more because they're going to be more financially savvy, then you're just kind of snatching them.

 

James Robert Lay: 

I want to come back to a point you made. It's your went through the educational experience, not just once, but twice. Yes. And it was the second time in a couple of others have done this as well. It's the second time through that that's where things click, that's where light bulbs start to go off. From your experience. Why is that? Because you didn't go through it once an organization's do that they'll go through it once. And they'll make some some progress for sure. But to see the journey that you took, and the not just the investment of dollars, but also the investment of time to see the acceleration, I think that's the difference there. Why, what's the difference between going through and learning something once and then coming back again, and going through almost the same exact curriculum, the same exact material, the same exact questions? How does that accelerate the progress compared to it just may be single, just from your experience?

 

Sara Williams: 

Yeah. I think a lot of it had to do with the fact that we knew that we were going to be touching the website, right when we were going through the program the first time. And the first time it happened, it was myself, my boss and our other team member who has since left. And then again, we took that pause during the emerge. And with that, we gained two new team members. And we had already begun our website journey at that point. So it was extremely helpful, especially for the team members to go through the program, and now be able to see why we were doing what we were doing. And again, I'm a very like hands on learner. And so the first time around, like I said, we knew Oh, we should write that down. We should remember to do that for when we're going to do the website. But then the second time, we're actually doing it. And before we had to launch it, we had the opportunity to kind of go back through the program. And oh, yeah, we need to remember to add that and then we could just jump right in and add it to the website. So I think that it was, it was a for me, it was an excellent refresher as well. But then there were definitely parts because I was actually doing it at that point. And it wasn't a pipe dream of oh, one day when we get to touch the website, we'll be able to do going and see. And so there was a lot of excitement around that too, to finally be able to, to launch it and to put what we had been talking about since July of 2020. In the practice. And I think

 

James Robert Lay: 

That's the point is the practical application, it's being able to turn that insight to turn that knowledge into action, but something else to that you queued in on that I've heard from other others who've gone through the experience. It's going through it as a team, and how that creates alignment and a common language and it gets people on the same page. What would you say to someone who is watching or listening? And once again, I know you're in a different situation. And the perception of marketing is different at Skyler than it is maybe at other financial brands, but someone who was watching or listening maybe they're even in an executive that like we don't have time. We don't have time to learn. We're too busy doing. We just got to keep the things going. And I bring that up because, Joe, we're busy during this period of time, y'all we're going through a merger y'all. We're building a new website, y'all we're launching a new brand. So I'm just using that as I think sometimes that's an excuse to not do something when in reality from what I observed through your experience, you're intentionally created the space and time to make this investment, not just for yourselves as individuals, but for a team to co create value for the organization at large.

 

Sara Williams: 

Yeah, yeah, you have definitely met us at an extremely busy point in our careers. And I know, I know, it's so hard to say like, Oh, you just have to make time for it. But I think that's something that Skyla has always done. And I know that you and I have talked about this, right? You've said, I think you need to, what is it you need to learn five hours every week to continue advancing. And I think Schuyler really kind of as a culture, we, we try very hard to put continuing education kind of at the forefront of what we do. And so I think part of that was definitely, you know, making sure that we we made the time for it. But the other thing is we were we were working towards a common goal, we knew that our website needed to be improved. Yes, we were rebranding and merging and doing a digital banking, conversion, and then merging again, but we knew that these things were necessary. And it allowed us to be better marketers. And it was all exciting stuff, too, because we were on an old WordPress site that had maybe one CTA and like a single table. And that was that right? And so that alone, just being able to add fresh life to it and a lot of more creativity and to learn something that was exciting. It kind of it made you want to go through the program, I know that that you know it made you want to find the time to do it. And so, and now kind of like, again, looking back on where we were three years ago, like, like I said, I couldn't imagine, you know, I'm throwing around marketing jargon and everyday conversation now that I don't even think that I would have known in 2020.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Well, you've also and I think that's the important point to pause on. Because not only did you launch a new website, you built a website that sells but then you're supporting that website. And this has been a big focus for you are building these automated workflow journeys. And you have done a tremendous job on this, not just from an execution standpoint, but from a strategy number one, and then number two, the way that you were able to communicate this, and CO create this, not just with the marketing team, but other key stakeholders with the within the organization. That's a key learning here for those who are watching and listening that this is not just a marketing activity. This is not just a marketing experience. It's a marketing sells leadership. When you think about the the workflows and the automation piece here, where is that created value for you for the team through the eyes of others, because I think marketing once again, is oftentimes misunderstood. But you're you already had the advantage that marketing is a value, but you've you've taken that to a whole new level now. Yeah.

 

Sara Williams: 

So okay, I should also say so we're a HubSpot on HubSpot now for our website. And we also obviously use them for marketing automation. And in 2002, so merger new website, and then in January of 22, we integrated our core system with an API. So now we're getting all the data into HubSpot that we have on the core, which makes our life so much easier. But I always kind of go back to before HubSpot. We were on WordPress. I think the only analytics that I was looking at on a semi regular basis was how many people were on the website with Google Analytics just at the top of the page. And then I would just kind of like hope that somebody would pass by and be like, Oh, by the way, we opened 30 Credit cards this weekend because of your email like I I would send things out into the abyss and just kind of hope that they worked and data I don't I don't want to say data wasn't important. It just never really got back to me. And so what I find most exciting about going back to your that nurture campaigns question is the data that we're able to then wrap around everything that marketing does. We have so we have an abandoned application workflow right now set up for our auto loans and our credit cards and we can say, Here's how many people abandon the application. Here's how many people received our email and then here's the additional amount of people that might aren't getting was able to recapture and send back through the funnel to finish that application. Same thing with credit cards. Even something as simple as, right, like our auto loan nurture campaign, we have options that you can request a call back that you can ask a question. And we're able to then track those people and see just how helpful the information is that we're providing them, what questions they're asking to our lending team, and then who, again, is able to kind of follow up and actually apply for that loan. So I think just all of the data that we can now provide through these workflows, and through the website, then we can turn around and say, Hey, this is how many people we got. And truly, this last last week, when I was in Charlotte, I had a our VP of lending, she came up to me, and she's like, I come to you for data questions now. And like that, again, it's just, I think it solidifies that marketing is seen as an asset and not just oh, well, you know, we need you to send this email. And this is what the credit union needs, right? Like they, again, our VP of lending, she asked us to kind of tear the emails that we send out, because we're armed mark, our marketing is effective, and it kind of overwhelms our staff. So we have to kind of slow play it to make sure that we're not getting 4000 applications in a weekend or something.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Well, I think that's a fantastic point, your marketing is effective. But if you go back to where you were pre pre journey experience, you mentioned, it was just Google Analytics. And and I want to pause on that point, because we're doing an industry study right now called banking on future growth. And one of the things that we found is that when it comes to measuring marketing performance, particularly through the lens of a website that sells in the majority of financial brand websites are not built through that construct right now. 42% said that they review their Google Analytics to measure their website performance. That's it. And Google Analytics, it paints a picture into the big data set into what people are doing, if you will, at a macro level. But since you're talking about data, another area that I feel we've collaborated on so well, is the website secret shopping studies with a digital secret shopping studies. To continuously come back and not have assumptions. It's like you build something, you launch it, but then you want to test that to validate. Okay, is this really what the market needs? And I appreciate the willingness to do so. Because not everyone is like that. Some people are like, we're gonna build this website, we're not gonna touch it for another 3457 years. And we're just gonna leave it there. You know, you're you're literally and this is not hyperbole, you're literally leaving millions, if not 10s of millions, if not even hundreds of millions of pitting upon your assets size of dollars in, in in loans and deposits on on the table. And so keeping in the theme of data, in looking at what you have gained through continuously secret shopping your website, how have you been able to apply that knowledge to optimize different pieces of a buying experience? Because it's not, you're not trying to boil the ocean, you're being very focused and intentional, around Otto around credit, around checking around even I'm gonna laugh about this, because it was interesting. money markets. I'll never forget when we did the money market study. And we had someone ask, or they were basically didn't ask they, one of the questions that we asked was, what's a money market account? Before you even get into the study? What's a money market account? In your own words, you remember that? And someone actually went, and you can hear them pause. And then they went, and they pulled up Google. And they were really almost like verbatim what a money market account is. Why is it important to to go to the market to gain this type of perspective? Because once again, we if we look at our current study right now within the vertical, around 83 85% of financial brands have never done any digital secret shopping study before at all.

 

Sara Williams: 

So and this is top of mind because we just did our credit card secret shopping yesterday with you. And I think that sometimes we get as marketers and you know, we Have our to do list and everything and we get so wrapped up in a we're already part of the financial industry. So we of course we know how to get a credit card or of course, we know what this product is compared to this one. And so just, you know that the money market question, I think that it's super important to always see what the user because again, I know that website, inside and out, I know exactly how to get to this page, because in my mind, that makes the most sense, because of course, you're going to click on these seven other buttons to get there, right. But again, if you follow any user journey, you're gonna get to things a little bit differently, too. So it's, I think that it's always super important to kind of step outside the financial space and to, because finances in general, I think, you know, they're all those terms, money markets, even but like API versus APR, and some people honestly don't know the difference. But, of course, you should know the difference. Of course, you know, a yield means that you're saving money, but then a rate is, you know, that's your interest rate. And this is how it's calculated. So I think in that sense, it's super important to get a fresh perspective from somebody that doesn't live and breathe the financial world every day. But then also, again, kind of going back to yesterday, a lot of the feedback that I think you provided was, we kind of, we made our page too skinny, the Explore page was almost too bare bones, because we wanted to kind of push them down and give them all the information, a couple pages in because that's where websites have been trending for the last few years is, you know, you want to click get a little bit of information, then you get another click, and then you get a little bit more. But now it kind of seems like it's, it's trending back to like 2015 2016, where everybody wants all the information on one page, so they can kind of quickly skim and find what they're looking for. And so that is also super important to just stay top of mind on what consumers are interested in, and how they how they browse, and how they search for things and what they're looking for

 

James Robert Lay: 

What I found actually very interesting in that particular study, and that's the thing, I mean, I think we've done like 1200 of these at this point, and you start to get common patterns. But then, every single time, there's always like that one or two things you're like, I didn't see that coming. I didn't, I didn't. That's something new that I've learned. It was the fact that the way that y'all had structured credit card, you had kind of the Explorer overview page in your primary or your main navigation. And then they can people can go to the individual cards if they wanted to learn more. But every it was 100%, everyone went to the Explore page, no one went to the individual card page. And once they were on the Explore page, there were paths for them to go into the deeper sub pages, but they chose not to, which is just a very, it's like, well, then you start. It's the Socratic methodology of why why why are they making that decision? And you keep asking why. And then you're like, Ah, now now I get and then they give you the feedback of Well, here's what you can do to make this page even that much better. And your your headache, you get a good page, you have a good foundation, but it seems like there's little insights that can take something and make it good to great. And in some cases, you know, when you're talking about like, small percentages to have conversion rate can have huge implications on like the bottom line, particularly when you're dealing with, you know, loans and deposits. I want to pull back up to the macro level here. And you know, thinking about where you've come from, because as you mentioned, it was just three of you. To begin this. You've, you've now added a sixth person coming in as a Content Manager. How is your team transformed the most through this experience here?

 

Sara Williams: 

Really good question. I think so we all work really well together as a team. And again, you met us at a very transitional time. There was a third team member who put in her notice right before the merge happens. And so then we were kind of a team of two for a little bit again and then we gain two new people and we had to kind of find the right fit for them as well. And then this past summer we merged again and we had to find the right fit for our fifth team member. So we all work very, very well together. But I think something and that that fifth team member, she went through like a hybrid program for DDI. She didn't do it with the rest of us because we graduated but we did force her to go through it. And again, she had the same kind of sentiment of Oh, I understand why, why you have the website this way or why you have these two CTAs and why this is important to put Get up here. So. But just as the years kind of gone on, I would say that we've all kind of really found our groove, right, we have our, our data analyst, and he does all the SEO pieces, but he works very closely with our content specialists who is looking at, you know, what people are searching for, and how they can get to the website, who is also working very closely with our marketing coordinator, who is working on all the imagery and the content for the website and the best flow for it. So I think that we're all just like really hitting a groove. Right now, we're all on the same page. And not to say that we weren't from the beginning. But again, now we've all graduated from the program, we know why we're doing it, we have, it's not just just because we wanted to add more fluff to the website by any means. And so like, even today, I was kind of sketching out, oh, this is what our new credit card page could look like. And everybody's commenting and making adjustments and tweaks. And so I think that, again, ties back to how we're very collaborative, like, we're not going to make a decision on our own. And we each all value each other's opinions, because we've all been through it, we know what the end goal is. And I could turn to any one of them. And we could kind of hash out, oh, well, this is how we could make this page better. Or this is how we could do this differently to make it better on the user.

 

James Robert Lay: 

Well, that's also something to, as you have gone through this experience, you'll have had specific way points every 90 days that you'll stop, you pause, you break free from what you've been doing, you review and reflect on the progress, you discuss what you've learned, you think about how you can do even better than the quarterly health checks. And it is just a way to like, move up to that 30,000 foot view. And it's intentional. It's that intentional space and time, and it's so easy to forget that. And I know, as you're keep going forward, you'll have that, that habit, you'll have that habit established. And I think that's the positive thing that you continue to take forward. As we start to wrap up, what about yourself, you know, if you think about yourself, as an individual, as a leader now to, you know, where do you feel like you've grown the most, on your own journey? Because you're not where you were when you started this? And you have I've seen that progress, I've seen that that leadership growth, that leadership development, where do you think that growth is the most for you?

 

Sara Williams: 

I would say, confidence in myself. And, again, I think that ties back a lot to 2020. When my boss was gone, I had to be making all these decisions of how we need to communicate this and you know, do that, and I was sitting in on meetings, and my, it was very evident that my opinion mattered. And again, I attribute that back to the organization that I'm in, right, but um, so just kind of the, I was given a lot of confidence, because, of course, she was like, Hey, I'm going to leave, it's up to you now, right. And she wouldn't have said that if she didn't mean it as so it's just slowly been built. And again, we had, it was a team of three. So I was the senior of the two of us. And I kind of took her under my wing and I kind of showed her the ropes, I didn't have a leadership title, or like management title by any means. But I was still, I still kind of had to step into that leadership role to lead just between the two of us. And then when the merge happened the first time around, again, I kind of stepped into, I was creating all the communication plans and kind of trying to help lead the charge. And so then our other two team members, were able to see that and I think, you know, the growth is just the confidence in finding my own voice too. And again, understanding that my voice matters and what I'm saying isn't always right. But, um, but that's okay. I don't know, like, that's okay.

 

James Robert Lay: 

And I think that's a point like, you know, when you find your voice, it's not about being right. It's, you're contributing and you're being a part of something that's greater than yourself. We need more of that. We need more of that collaborative perspective, because if we can put the right or the wrong a little bit of that, that that's ego we put some of the ego aside, like sometimes like I'm not here to be right. I'm here to have an opinion. Share that know that that is how heard. And let's take that knowledge that dialogue, discourse discussion, let's take that and make something even greater than what we could do a as individuals or be based upon past perspective. And it's through some of those quarterly health checks, you've had that dialogue, you've had that discussion it gets, it provides that clarity. And if you think about the progression here, you know, clarity helps to increase the courage for an individual for team for an organization, you increase the courage to continue to commit, because commitment is so important to commit to move forward with confidence, confidence is key confidence is is contagious. And I appreciate appreciate the confidence that you've just shared, just through this whole experience. Today, reflecting on your own experience, always want to wrap up on a practical point for someone watching or listening with what we've discussed here today. And reflecting on your own journey, what is one thing that you would recommend they do, so that they can move forward with confidence on their own journey? Something small, something practical.

 

Sara Williams: 

I think and this is something that I truly believe has helped me as a leader, and I've stolen it directly from you is asking my team members what's been going well, and that is truly just because again, with the confidence, like you're building that connection with them, that personal connection, and it's, there's a, there's a level of trust that you will, you'll kind of build into that as well. And you can have that relationship. So it's not just work, right. So you have that, and you get more comfortable with them. And then from there, you can kind of feel you would feel more comfortable kind of taking risks and thinking outside of the box and finding your voice a little bit more.

 

James Robert Lay: 

It's creating that psychological safety. And that is so important, particularly when you are working to innovate in grow, and expand to know that you know what, I'm going to save place. I might, I might not get it right all the time. But hey, we don't fail here. We have winners. And we have learners. And we're going to focus on what's been going well we're going to focus on for for those watching and listening you don't have context is a key methodology that we teach. Well is an acronym for winning exciting learning and looking. And it really does create a positive perspective in the mind because the mind can only hold a positive or negative thought emotion at a time. So this has been such a fun, wonderful conversation to reflect back on the progress that you've made over the past few years on your journey, as an individual as a continuing to grow your yourself as as a leader, to think about your team to think about your organization as a whole. If someone wants to connect with you, and say hello, and continue the discussion. We've started here today. What's the best way for them to reach out and say hello.

 

Sara Williams: 

They could find me on LinkedIn as Sarah Williams, or send me an email at Williams at sky with you.com. Connect

 

James Robert Lay: 

Connect with Sara, easy to find easy to find on LinkedIn. I just say go to LinkedIn. And it's a great way it's a great way to connect. It's a great way to say hello, because it's through the connections that that we are continuing to facilitate here. That's how we're all getting even better together. So Sarah, thank you for joining me for another episode of the banking on digital growth podcast. This has been fun today.

 

Sara Williams: 

Thank you so much.

 

James Robert Lay: 

As always, and until next time, be well. Do good and be the light

Brief Summary of Episode #363

Imagine it's early 2020.

The world is about to enter an unprecedented period of lockdown due to COVID-19.

ur credit union is facing not only this global crisis but also an impending merger, the launch of a new brand, and the daunting task of building and continually optimizing a website to support various business lines.

Overwhelmed?

Stressed?

In this episode of the Digital Growth Journeys series, we're delving into the story of Sara Williams, the marketing director at Skyla Credit Union, and her team's incredible journey through these tumultuous times.

Sara shares the pivotal lessons they've learned, the strategies that have driven their success, and how they've transformed challenges into opportunities for substantial growth. 

 

Key Insights and Takeaways

  • Marketing strategy, automation, and data analysis. (13:52)
  • The impact of digital secret shopping studies. (26:41)
  • Personal growth and leadership development. (31:23)